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Marble Mountains Sasquatch

Marble Mountains Wilderness

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#1 mrpudge

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Posted 02 March 2015 - 07:54 PM

Hi, Im a new member and have just joined the site with my brother. We want to go on an expedition this summer and are researching where to go. Has anyone explored the Marble Mountains Wilderness? The specific area I want to go is around Wooley Creek. Thanks


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#2 jayjeti

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Posted 03 March 2015 - 01:58 AM

Here is a link to video in the Web Gems section of this site of a sasquatch sighted at Marble Mountain.

 

http://sasquatchrese...e-mountain-man/

 

There are a number of experienced people here who could answer questions you have.  One thing to look for is stick structures that lets you know you are in their territory.  They vary and can be as simple as many long sticks leaned against a few trees or weaved together in a more complex fashion.  They set up near water sources.  You might want to be on the look out for any structures they may have made, whether blinds or shelters, which will be an unnatural structure made of all broken branches, nothing cut.  Also notice any trees that have been twisted off four foot or so off the ground.  And of course you can look for footprints, but most forest areas don't translate those very well.  I've seen all of these things in Southern Oregon except for a weaved stick structure.

 

Perhaps others here can weigh in on how you could find bigfoot.  Don't shine lights into the woods at night if you want them to come around your camp.  It's better not to use flashlights in your camp if it's possible to get by with a fire and moonlight.  You might hear sticks snap that they step or crawl on when attempting to check you out at night.



#3 montanabert

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Posted 03 March 2015 - 03:35 PM

Excellent Jay. I am the older brother of Mr.Pudge just for future reference.

From all that I gather, the longer and more consistent interaction you have with them, the more they will 'trust' you. 

Seeing as we will only be in the wilderness for 4 to 5 days max, 'trust' is likely out the window. However I would like to try gifting with them.

What are your thoughts on gifting with them?



#4 jayjeti

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Posted 03 March 2015 - 07:21 PM

You should leave food items out of sight of your campsite.  Andy or Kris should probably answer this question and about cultivating a relationship as they've spent time building rapport with a few groups of sasquatches.



#5 SRA Andy

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 11:46 AM

Wow, huge topic...

 

For starters, I have never been on an expedition on the West Coast.  I'll defer to Jayjetti for west coast specifics.

 

As for an approach into an area here's a few points to consider:

 

  • Study the maps of the area very closely first.  Figure out a few things:
    1. Where is the water?
    2. Where are the ungulates (deer, elk, etc...)
    3. Where are the areas of wilderness that people don't or seldom go that they can use as refuge.
  • Where these three things meet, is where you will most likely find sasquatches.
  • Scout the location for signs of squatch activity.  This part is hard to give you over the internet, it is the stuff we typically show people in person on expeditions.  Things to look for are tracks, scat, food sources, tall-boy trails, twisted tree-breaks, gates, structures, concave trails, et. al.
  • Find a camp where you are near to these signs of activity, ideally a spot where there are no other people around.  We use the dispersed camping rules in MN and WI a lot.
  • If possible, start an audio recorder as soon as you arrive and keep it running the entire time you are there.
  • Use wood knocks to introduce yourselves and see if they respond.  If they are in the area, they will usually respond.  They will also likely come to see who's knocking.
  • Do not scream or howl, while you may get a response and even possibly a visit, the squatches will be wary of you in the long term. They figure out very quickly that you are trying to trick them. They do not seem to react negatively to the knocks though, which likely they see as us trying to communicate with them; but when we mimic them with our voices, I think it insults them.
  • No dogs!  They will usually back way off if they see you have dogs.  If your dogs chase after them, say good bye to your dog; they will kill them.
  • Set up your camp.  Make sure you laugh, play, and have fun doing this.  Do not allow any guns to be visible at any time (this is not saying you can't have a gun with; just keep it concealed). Do not try to be stealthy.  They will interpret your motives as Hunting.  You want then to be curious about you, not afraid.
  • Use no directed lights if you can help it.  If you do use a directed light, use only red light.  Nondirected lights, such as a fire or gas lanterns appear to be fine, but we try to limit our use of lights as much as possible.  You can also use white lights in tents and cars, so long as you are not shining them out of the windows. Do not hold or point anything at the woods that looks like it might be a light you could turn on.  To that point, try to disguise the shape of cameras and IR devices.
  • Before dark, scout the area around camp and find a stump or log, out of sight from camp, where you can offer gifts.  It should be in the open and visible, yet have some good concealed approaches that they can use to get to it unobserved.  At dusk, go to the site and offer your gifts.  Keep your eyes down, and hold the gifts up.  Talk to them as if they are watching you and understand you.  Offer the gifts to them and thank them for letting you stay in their forest.  Place the gifts and bow towards them with your hands out as a sign of offering and submission.
  • If you eat meat, bring a some steaks along and cook them on a grill over your fire (they will likely be sitting down-wind of you and will smell them).  Bring an extra one (small is fine), cook it, and bring it on a paper plate to your offering spot (if you can afford it). 
  • Foods for the gift spot: Apples, Corn on the Cob, Peanut butter, chocolate bars, chocolate bars dipped in peanut butter, peanuts and other nuts, bread with syrup, bread with peanut butter, cooked meat especially steak and bacon, etc...
  • At camp, be aware of the sounds around you.  Don't jump and stare at every stick snap.  Remember that it is possible that they understand English.  Don't point!
  • Play music, especially Native Flute.  We have found that our rate of camp visits has increased since I have been playing flute in the woods at night.
  • If they throw things into camp, ignore it as best you can, noting the time. They will typically toss objects into camp to gauge your reactions.
  • If you are going to use trail cameras, keep them out of the woods.  Instead, set them up on your vehicle where the sound of it will mask the sounds of the camera. Point any such cameras across your camp so that they view both fire and tent (the most likely places to receive a visit).

I hope this helps. Maybe Todd, Kris, or Jim can chime in with anything i forgot.

 

Andy


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#6 jayjeti

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 02:41 PM

Thanks for the great input Andy.  You're right about don't point.  I pointed at a bush that I had seen one behind earlier and it stood up and walked away.  It was still behind the bush although I could no longer see it.  He absolutely understood that gesture, and if we use finger pointing to ID their location to others, like the direction you've heard something, they will know they have been made.  I think you meant to write, "Don't jump and STARE at every stick snap."  

 

You should probably explain the trails they make more and also what the gating is.  

 

...................................................................................................

 

To The Brothers Grimm, on the home page of this site under "Sasquatch" click on "behavior."  Andy wrote that.  It is excellently written and explains a lot of features with photos.  The photo just under the topic "stick structure" is similar to what I observed in southern Oregon, with a number of long sticks leaned vertically against trees.  Maybe other sasquatches in the Pacific NW do the same.  It was actually a group of trees together that exhibited this, with none of the other surrounding trees having anything like that.  Very close to those trees I made of casts of 17" long bare footprints.  There was also a section of ferns that had been trampled over close by giving me the impression this area was a regular route.

 

I had returned alone to make casts of what we had found earlier and I heard two wood knocks in the direction I had come from.  After I had made the casts and I was ready to leave I made a single wood knock that was replied to with a single knock about 2 seconds later in the same direction I had heard the previous knocks.  I tried to make two knocks but my stick broke on the second swing.  I'm relating all this as examples of how you might know you are in their habitat.  

 

Here is a link to "behavior" at this site.

 

http://sasquatchrese...s.org/behavior/


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#7 SRA-Todd

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 04:06 PM

Bring an extra change of underwear.  

 

On a serious note.  Once you've established camp, gather together and go over this list with everyone.  Establish your directions so everyone is clear where north/south etc., so if you hear or see something, saying the direction it came from instead of staring and pointing, as indicated above.  If the cover is good, they will get close.  

 

Be aware of the normal noises because it tends to get really quiet when they are around.  It's eerie when all of a sudden, it goes silent.  

 

This is hard to do, but try and pay attention to the surroundings and maybe even get some still pictures during the day.  At night, if they do come in close, they usually stay very still, impersonating a stump or log.  If you know a stump is cut off at shin level and looking at in the dark, see it's no longer that size, then they are checking you out.  

 

Fires are great if the threat of wildfire isn't too high.  I like to leave the camp during periods, taking either a thermal or night vision and after letting someone know where I'm going, and scan the woods.  I will stand out there for long periods, seeing if anything has joined us.  I always take my two-way radio with me as everyone in our camps is required to have them at all times.  It's a good habit to get into and make sure everyone has them.  

 

Gifting food can be tricky in bear country.  I inadvertently left out a bag of corn nuts one night and that brought in a momma bear and her two cubs.  Needed the extra pair of shorts that trip.  Last time out, I left a closed jar of peanut butter and a beanie baby on a small table.  I haven't been back, so have no clue if it worked.  Hopefully we get back there this spring so we'll see.  

 

Good luck and have fun. 


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#8 montanabert

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 05:42 PM

I'm of the belief that we'll be needing multiple pairs of underwear should we have any interaction with them.
We'll be traveling deep into the wilderness to Wooley lake in the marble mtns. So gifting will be limited to what we can carry but the landscape seems ripe for sasquatch.
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#9 jayjeti

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 08:28 PM

At night, if they do come in close, they usually stay very still, impersonating a stump or log.  If you know a stump is cut off at shin level and looking at in the dark, see it's no longer that size, then they are checking you out.  

 

Here's something posted in Sasquatch Stories recently about them mimicking large rocks or tree stumps.

 

http://sasquatchrese...ic-tree-stumps/



#10 mrpudge

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 12:30 AM

Maybe these creatures are not to be trifled with. No one can know what a wild animal's intentions are, and going into a remote place trying to attract a large primate that wants to be left alone, on the belief that it is docile seems like a big risk. Are people always safe in these situations? Maybe its different when you're 16 miles from a trailhead. How often are people driven out, or intimidated by these creatures? If that happens often to people, that tells us these creatures are not friendly, and can pose a threat to humans. What happened in Bob Garett's video? Did people get killed by these creatures?



#11 montanabert

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 01:07 AM

I don't think we can treat it as a"docile" creature. They are wild animals and should be treated as so. We can never let our guards down and I think there is definitely something to be said for being 16 miles into the bush with only two people. How good of an idea is it to interact with these animals on their turf, so far from any other human? We're not a group of 5 or 6 men. We're two men. Something to think about.



#12 jayjeti

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 02:54 AM

I'll give you my opinion but others here need to address your concerns.

 

I would not be too overly concerned, but it's healthy to be cautious.  I believe the overwhelming majority of sasquatches are not a great threat to humans.  When I'm in the field we carry hand guns (in holsters), and I really do feel more comfortable having that for any wild animal.  From what I've read I believe people alone are more at risk, that sasquatches seem to be much more emboldened to approach a lone person than they are for two or more.  The SRA uses a buddy system when they lead expeditions, which is for all types of safety concerns.

 

It's my opinion that sasquatches are afraid of humans because of guns, that they have no fear of other animals but view us as the apex predator, and that's one of the reasons they are so fanatical about staying hidden from humans.  More than wild animals I think of them as wild people.  A cougar or a bear might not understand what a gun is, but sasquatches are more aware.  There is a theory that sasquatches became much less aggressive toward humans once guns were introduced into the wilderness.  I also suspect they view us as "other people," not like the animals, and react accordingly.

 

I was injured by a sasquatch years ago but it was my fault because I injured it first, throwing a rock and hitting it.  It evened the score by throwing rocks back at me.  When we were leaving the others panicked and got up the hill from the river and I got left behind alone and it came right up to me, within a few feet, but it never hurt me.  Like some other incidents/theories I've read, since I was alone it was emboldened to come closer to me.  It was interested in the stringer of fish I was carrying, and it could have just taken them from me, but it didn't.

 

They have a social culture/justice of some kind.  As I'm sure the other SRA members can relate their experiences of leaving food out in their camp, and finding evidence that they were in their camp when everyone was away, but none of the food will be touched.  But if you leave food for them away from camp they take that.  I believe they are a species of man and thus they have a culture totally unlike wild animals.  Perhaps just like human society they have some bad seeds, sociopaths of some sort.  But I wouldn't be stressed out that you life is in eminent danger.

 

I'm sure others might be able to address this better than I can, and I welcome any difference of opinion others might have.


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#13 SRA Andy

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 10:06 AM

I would strongly caution against doing a 16 mile trek into their territory as your first foray into attempting to draw them in and interact with you.  To be honest, I would find an area where you can interact with them and yet have your cars near, should you get uncomfortable.  We never know how a new squatcher is going to react to them. Ideally, find someone to go with who has experience with them and can better interpret what they are doing. 

 

I've had seasoned woodsmen bolt for their cars and leave in the dead of night after a simple stalking.  It is not something you can know about yourself until you experience it.

 

Two is also a very small number.  If they feel that they do not want you around, they will go to lengths to drive you away.  When that happens and it becomes more than you can take, do you want a 16 mile hike through the black of night between you and safety? A couple years ago, one of our most seasoned veterans (the guy who wrote How to Find Bigfoot), decided to stay an extra night after the rest of us left at the site with the squatches that I consider our most friendly.  That night, they came at him from all sides, at least four of them.  They shook trees, threw things, and likely hit him with repeated barrages of infrasound.  Before he even knew what he'd done, he was in his truck and on the road out of there, having left all his gear behind, but at least he had a way to get out.

 

I know of very few seasoned squatchers who would attempt what you are proposing; please consider starting out a bit slower.  What you propose is a bit like jumping into the deep end of a pool as a means to learn how to swim.

 

Are they safe...sometimes.  Are they dangerous....yes, sometimes.


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#14 SRA Andy

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 10:10 AM

I'll pose this one to Todd:  Even with all your field time and the many nights you've spent at Heart Camp, would you go just you and Eric alone to Heart camp, leaving your cars 5 miles back at the main road?


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#15 jayjeti

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 02:21 PM

Andy, I appreciate your input.  You have a lot more experience at this than I do.  What you described adds to the theory I've read that sasquatches are much more emboldened to approach and harass a single lone person.  

 

This is an interesting topic.  Do you think shinning a flashlight at those shaking bushes and screaming would make them back off some; have you ever tested that?  I read one account of a man alone being harassed, including shaking bushes, and he got his rifle out and it all stopped, even without him firing a shot.  Have you had negative experiences that caused you to leave an area?


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#16 SRA-Todd

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 02:26 PM

Hmmm, that's a tough one Andy.  I remember one trip, I think was in 2011, I got back there and Chris and Keith arrived earlier, but had left, so I was alone setting up my tent.  As I was setting up, I starting hearing stick breaks and they were coming from two different areas, east and south.  Having just arrived, most of my stuff was still in the car.  I got in and got on the radio asking where everyone was.  Turns out everyone was at Hebb camp and I felt very alone.  I stayed in the car for maybe 5 minutes before gathering the courage to get out and finish setting up.  

 

Now staying there the whole time without my mobile panic room, not sure I would do that.  I might, but I know these things are 9 freaking feet tall and could use me as a toothpick if they wanted.  


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#17 jayjeti

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 02:39 PM

A question for the brothers.  Are there not any forest roads near Wooley Lake?  I would think one should at least be near there, or maybe none come that close.

 

I found this

 

WOOLEY LAKE Elevation 6,700 ft; 6.3 acres; 84 ft deep. A lightly fished, deep blue water lake containing rainbow trout. No trail. A 1-hour hike via rough terrain over the ridge to the north of Grant's Meadow or via Heather Lake from Grant's Meadow.  

 

 

 

It is 1.4 miles off of the Pacific Coast Trail.



#18 SRA Andy

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 03:14 PM

Andy, I appreciate your input.  You have a lot more experience at this than I do.  What you described adds to the theory I've read that sasquatches are much more emboldened to approach and harass a single lone person.  

 

This is an interesting topic.  Do you think shinning a flashlight at those shaking bushes and screaming would make them back off some; have you ever tested that?  I read one account of a man alone being harassed, including shaking bushes, and he got his rifle out and it all stopped, even without him firing a shot.  Have you had negative experiences that caused you to leave an area?

 

Usually, a white-light flash light will shut down all activity and they will pull back.  However, I have also heard stories where they got pissed by the light and started throwing rocks, so...

 

No, I have never completely left an area due to intimidation.  I fled once after getting zapped, but stayed in the general area.  I've been fairly creeped out a few times and wanted to leave, but didn't.

 

I took a lot of animal behavior classes in college and I try to hold myself in a submissive stance and pose when in their territory.  I figure that if they see me as accepting of their dominance, they are less likely to be aggressive to me.  Most of the people I know who have been attacked/zapped were taking a dominant posture/actions at the time (including myself the few times I've been hit).


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#19 SRA Andy

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 03:19 PM

Now staying there the whole time without my mobile panic room, not sure I would do that.  I might, but I know these things are 9 freaking feet tall and could use me as a toothpick if they wanted.  

 

LOL.  Yeah there is no adreniline rush quite like being stalked by a 9 foot tall hominoid in the dead of night. 

 

Honestly, I think the three of you have had such good luck over the years because none of you are aggressive in the least in the woods.  Chris, Kris, and Jim have a hard time turning off "Hunter Mode" and I think this makes the squatches just a tad more leery around them.

 

Me, I just assume my usual technique to lure them into a false sense of security (see my avatar).  That and bribes of grilled Spam.


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#20 montanabert

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 03:49 PM

Can you guys explain being zapped?




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