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Eye Drops Double Night Vision

september 2009 night vision

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#1 jayjeti

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Posted 10 October 2014 - 06:54 PM

The following article claims that it might be possible to develop eye drops for humans that double night vision capacity and enable humans to see some of the red light spectrum that is normally invisible to humans in low light conditions.  The research came from studying fish which can see the red end of the light spectrum.

 

This has two implications for sasquatch research.  Will field researchers someday be able to use this enhancement while doing research at night, and secondly, does this have any implication on whether sasquatches can see IR light.  It might not, but many believe they can see it.  Fish and reptiles can see the red end of the light spectrum, but most all mammals cannot see the red end of the light spectrum, with primates (including Humans) being the exception.  I still wonder if sasquatch night vision includes it being able to see further into the IR range than humans can.  No other mammal that has night vision has cones that can see IR, but sasquatches being from the primate linage can.

 

http://discovermagaz...ve-night-vision



#2 SRA Kris

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Posted 10 October 2014 - 07:03 PM

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  • Forget the Goggles: Chlorophyll Eye Drops Give Night Vision
 
Forget the Goggles: Chlorophyll Eye Drops Give Night Vision What the dragonfish discovered through evolution, the U.S. military wants to apply to the battlefield.
By Melinda Wenner|Friday, September 04, 2009
eyedropmedia.jpg?mw=300
Image: Dreamstime/Brightqube

 

Seeing in the dark could soon be as easy as popping a pill or squeezing some drops into your eyes, thanks to some new science, an unusual deep-sea fish, and a plant pigment.

 

In the 1990s, marine biologist Ron Douglas of City University London discovered that, unlike other deep-sea fish, the dragonfish Malacosteus nigercan perceive red light. Douglas was surprised when he isolated the chemical responsible for absorbing red: It was chlorophyll. “That was weird,” he says. The fish had somehow co-opted chlorophyll, most likely from bacteria in their food, and turned it into a vision enhancer.

 

In 2004, Ilyas Washington, an ophthalmic scientist at Columbia University Medical Center, came across Douglas’s findings. Washington knew that the mechanisms involved in vision tend to be similar throughout the animal kingdom, so he wondered whether chlorophyll could also enhance the vision of other animals, including humans. His latest experiments in mice and rabbits suggest that administering chlorophyll to the eyes can double their ability to see in low light. The pigment absorbs hues of red light that are normally invisible in dim conditions. That information is then transmitted to the brain, allowing enhanced vision.

 

Washington is now developing ways to deliver chlorophyll to human eyes safely and easily, perhaps through drops. He believes that a night-vision drug would be most useful on the battlefield, so it is no surprise that the U.S. Department of Defense is funding his work. “The military would want this biological enhancement so they don’t have to carry nighttime goggles” during operations in the dark, he says.


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#3 SRA Kris

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Posted 10 October 2014 - 07:04 PM

Not sure I'd try this right away...and risk my vision over the long term.


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#4 jayjeti

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Posted 10 October 2014 - 07:19 PM

I'm waiting for the x-ray vision drops so I can see through things like superman.  I want to see the sasquatch hiding behind a bush.  When I was a kid this other kid got some glasses with spiraling whirls on them, and I put them on and told other kids they were x-ray glasses and I could see through their clothes, and pretended like I could look all through their clothes, and some kids were believing me and reacting to it, and wanting to see for themselves.  It was funny.



#5 SRA Kris

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Posted 10 October 2014 - 07:23 PM

I think the military has something like an x-ray scope...which isn't eye drops...but I think would do the same thing.

 

I was the kid who tested the person with the glasses to see if they worked...and if they did, i tried to figure out how to have a parent get me a pair...which often times failed.


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#6 jayjeti

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Posted 28 March 2015 - 01:41 PM

Here is a recent article on eye drops that create night vision titled: 

Night vision eyedrops allow vision of up to 50m in darkness

 .

 

http://www.independe...s-10138046.html

 

 

It might sound like something straight out of Q’s laboratory or the latest Marvel film but a group of scientists in California have successfully created eye drops that temporarily enable night vision. . . .  The effect was apparently almost instantaneous and, after an hour, he was able to distinguish shapes from 10 metres away in the dark and soon at even greater distances.

“We had people go stand in the woods,” Licina said, “At 50 metres, I could figure who they were, even if they were standing up against a tree” . . . .  The effect of the chemical only lasted for a few hours and the test subject's eyesight returned to normal the next day.

 

The organisation has released a paper that detailed the experiment in their website. It says that more research will need to be conducted to measure the actual amount of electrical stimulation increase in the eye whilst the long term effects of the procedure will require further investigation.







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