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NC: Aggravated Sasquatch Encounter


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#1 SRA Andy

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 08:35 PM

Discuss the NC: Aggravated Sasquatch Encounter report here.


Don't Believe, Know.


#2 ShaineTW

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 02:32 AM

This is indeed a high quality report.  I can find no reason to question the authenticity aside from the anecdotal nature of it.  I'll look forward to hearing the recording. 

 

In the beginning he believes the individual to be human and gradually begins to wonder if it is something else. 

At what point in the encounter do you think he made the distinction of it being a non-human hominid?


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#3 jayjeti

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 06:03 AM

Hello Shaine,

 

This is actually my encounter, my first personal exposure.  The first time I had any thoughts that it might be a sasquatch was when it was making it's loud screams and someone in our party suggested that it might be Knobby, a regional name given to a bigfoot creature, due to the screams it was making being similar to a highly public series of encounters that occurred over a short period of time.  That was a long time ago, but as my memory serves me I believe I was on the fence for awhile on whether this could actually be a sasquatch or not.  At first I wondered what animal could make that sound.  When it was throwing rocks occasionally that ruled out all animals but primates; so, I figured it had to be human or a bigfoot, and I knew no human was capable of making a high pitched scream that loud, and I was wondering if it was a person with some kind of device that was doing that noise.

 

I don't know at what point I completely ruled it out as being a human; although I mostly leaned toward it being non-human even before I threw rocks at it.  But when I saw it during the rock duel (up the hill from us and later on the path), it was huge, and I know at that point I more strongly gravitated toward it being a sasquatch.  The inkling that held me back was being somewhat in disbelief that this could actually be what was happening -- having a struggle with a creature that is mythological in terms of scientifically recognized animals.   It was blowing my mind so to speak; but as the encounter dragged on I entirely ruled out it being a human.


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#4 ShaineTW

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 10:50 AM

jayjeti,  thanks for the reply.  I'm glad to know it was your report and what an amazing event to recollect!  There is most certainly a great deal of information to be gleaned about Sasquatch from this encounter and much of it seems very logical to me.  Also there is much consistency with other credible reports.  I'm impressed with how much perserverence you maintained in holding your ground.  I believe you were defending more than just your fish and safety, but also justice for the situation.  For me your story communicates that you wanted the encounter to be resolved with justice and understanding between the both of you concerning the duel that took place. 


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#5 jayjeti

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 03:27 AM

Shaine, no, he was seeking justice, true, but I felt like I was dealing with an inferior animal.  I wanted resolution because I was fearful it was going to end very badly for me.  I think I must have hit him in the head with a rock because he was head hunting until he finally scored one and quit.  In my report I commented how they have a vengeance culture, evidenced in the many accounts of them seeking revenge if something is done to them.  In speaking with SRA Andy he said it likely relates to their gifting culture, that he was owed something and he was not satisfied until he collected the debt owed to him, namely a head shot.  I think Andy is likely right, and in that same light you touch on a valid point, that they have a form of justice.

 

Among some Indian legends are tales of trade with sasquatches, where Indians would leave them things like blankets, baskets, etc. and sasquatches in turn would leave acorns and other things that Indians could use.  I read a story about an Indian in the early 20th century who had a cabin and lived off the land, hunting and fishing.  Then one day while carrying a bunch of fish he had caught he saw a sasquatch standing just off the trail he was on, upon which he stopped walking, with both just standing there staring at one another.  Then he dropped the fish and walked on.  After that he started getting deer skins left at his cabin.  Evidently the sasquatch had seen him tanning deer hides and figured that was an appropriate gift.   

 

If we put their gifting culture in societal terms you could say they have both a form of economy and their own justice system that works for them, and in their realm the rules apply to us also.  How they interact with us might shed light on how they engage each other, on the assumption they must do similar acts with one another.  I think witness accounts can teach us a lot about their culture.  But to put this in perspective, we shouldn't pick-up on that one nature and overly praise their sense of justice.  The one I encountered was a bit of a scoundrel, harassing and intimidating us in hopes of getting some fish, even trying to steal one when my back was turned.  Maybe they are more like us than we fathom, being both just and opportunistic as varying circumstances arise.      


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#6 TruthHunter

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Posted 20 February 2015 - 12:57 PM

This particular report is unique. I have never heard anything like it.

Didn't this guy know what fear is? I wonder if he was a little bit drunk. Alcohol 

wasn't mentioned, but the general detachment these guys display is beyond

belief.

This may explain the deference the Forest Person shows the guy. He treated him as an

equal in an odd sort of way. Its almost like he is acting like he's another FP.

 

Unless this turns out to be the colossal output of someone with Munchausen's syndrome,

it opens a great deal of insight into how to interact with these beings. I immediately began

looking at night vision goggles again. Leaving the flashlights and fires behind apparently

is extremely important.

I wonder, perhaps this FP had successfully lifted fish before. This would explain his persistence.

If he had   succeeded most times, it would explain how he got sucked into the whole thing. 

 

The duel is just too much!  Its like getting  drawn into a stoplight drag race, realizing later

that you were completely out of your mind.

 

(II had read this story through, but I didn't read the comments. Sorry Jay, the crack about Munchausens was an attempt at humor. You have to admit, its hard to credit

I have heard of somewhat similar interactions, but none that really got personal like this one)


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#7 jayjeti

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Posted 21 February 2015 - 12:05 AM

No, I wasn't drunk.  It's possible we could have brought some beer with us but I don't remember.  But I wasn't intoxicated in any way.  The problem is more one of being young and stupid.  I didn't know what I was dealing with.

 

Yes, in many ways it was like two people in a tense situation.  I believe my interaction shows we can communicate with them in a rudimentary way.  You said he acted like I was another forest person.  I believe its possible their interaction with us reflects the social habits of their culture to some degree.  The gifting often displayed in response to leaving them food might reflect some kind of equal justice or equilibrium in their society.  The fact that he was not satisfied until he got a head shot reflects that, that he was owed that.   

 

He might have had people respond to his antics better than I did and give him fish, or it wouldn't surprise me if he had not stolen fish before.  There are accounts of them stealing people's fish.  Sasquatches tend to inhabit more areas where there is abundant water, and they certainly like fish.

 

The one thing that impressed me about him was the accuracy of his throwing arm.  It was just superb.  And really in about every physical way they exceed humans, possessing great natural athletic abilities.  They can scale sheer cliffs quickly, climb trees, swim underwater, and run 35 - 45 mph depending on different people's estimates.  I read one article claiming their mode of bipedalism and foot morphology was superior to the manner humans walk, and they can splay their toes to get better traction like we splay our fingers.  They seem to have superior vision (at least night vision), and studying recordings of their language they produced sounds both above and below the human threshold of hearing, which might indicate a broader range of hearing.  Their strength is unmatched.  A 160 pound Chimpanzee has 5 times the strength of a man the same weight, the reason being is the type of muscle fiber they have.  Human muscles are geared more for fine motor skills, whereas chimps is more for brute strength.  I wonder if sasquatches possess the later, and given their size it would explain their herculean like feats of strength.

 

But we outmatch them in abstract thought and other cognitive abilities.  


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#8 TruthHunter

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 06:59 PM

The more reports I read, the more this one stands out as unique.  First

only a tiny fraction of reports don't include an absolutely terrified human.

Second when the FP/BF knows he is detected, he usually leaves as if he

were equally uncomfortable. Third, this is one of the longest interactions

ever. The average is probably less than 30 seconds.

 

The lessons are:

lights and fires keep them away.

Don't be afraid.

Have something they REALLY want.

Perhaps don't pay too much attention to them.



#9 jayjeti

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 09:59 PM

Yes, it is a unique encounter.  What makes it especially unique is there may have been some rudimentary communication between us.  One thing that increased the contentious nature of the encounter is I injured it.  And there are certainly many precedents of long aggressive encounters after injuring one, such as what happened at Ape Canyon when one of the men may have shot one.

 

http://sasquatchrese...-incident-1924/

 

Also, it's said that sasquatches in the south tend to be more aggressive.  But if we had flashlights hardly none of this would have happened the way it did.  Flashlights are one of the greatest deterrence of sasquatches.

 

And of course, we didn't succumb to the intimidation for a long time, and to some degree we ignored it a lot of the time.  When we were fishing, watching our poles we kept our backs to it, which I believe it likely crept down very close to us at times when it went silent.  The undergrowth was heavy there.






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