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Squatch Crazy, Part 7


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#1 SRA Andy

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 09:15 PM

Discuss the Squatch Crazy, Part 7 Post here.


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#2 MissSquatcher

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 07:10 PM

Ahhhh!!! That's awesome!! What a great encounter! Creeped me out reading about it stomping around your camp. Couldn't imagine what you guys were feeling and thinking at the time.


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#3 SRA Kris

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 09:43 AM

What is frustrating for me, is that this isn't even the good part yet...

 

This is the part of the experience where your mind starts to try and turn things into what it could be and what it couldn't be.  Accompanied by a vastly heightened sense of awareness to sounds in the woods.  The forest/brush wall was so think that Andy and I tested visibility in afternoon lighting and just 5 feet in and with bright colors we basically disappeared - more on this later.

 

This is where the use of the mantra we made for ourselves in jest actually applied:

Not every twig snap is a squatch

Not every <insert> is a squatch

 

I keep asking myself why Andy is taking his sweet old time between installments.

Its not like he should spend time with family, do projects at home, have personal vacations and family gatherings...


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#4 jayjeti

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 04:58 AM

I had not read any of the squatch crazy thread until just now, I read all 8.

 

The first time you left apples out was just after it made some thuds and other noises that evening.  When it did it a second time the following morning while you were in camp, making noises in the woods again, I believe it was wanting more food, that it was repeating noises in hopes of getting a like response when it made noises the evening before, and I believe it would have been prudent at that point to set some apples out then to elicit a "conditioned response," that making its presence known generates a reward.  In # 8 you put some more apples out that evening, which is good.  I was just wondering if putting food out right after one makes its presence known could generate a conditioned response, making it work for food?

 

I had one that I believe wanted some fish I had caught harass me in hopes of getting some fish, and so reading your account made me think yours was trying to get some more food too.  In retrospect I'm disappointed I didn't give mine some fish, and I suppose I'm thinking about your hungry Sasquatch, that you could have even left something before you left camp that morning.  Of course I know I'm quarterbacking in hindsight which is easier than real time.  I like the idea of eliciting a conditioned response, where we can cause them to perform by giving immediate rewards.  That interaction would be a rudimentary form of communication, and yours may have been doing just that.



#5 SRA Andy

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 09:45 PM

Remember that I was a total newbie at that point and was moving around that weekend still wondering when i was going to wake up and find that the world had gone back to normal. ;)


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#6 jayjeti

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 02:42 AM

I realize that.  I'm just thinking out loud, reminiscing on my own failure to give a hungry Sasquatch a fish when it got close and personal.  I was just theorizing about why they do what they do and possible strategies in answer to it.  Last month we brought chairs and set out in the forest near dusk to see if we could get some action, setting up in the direction I had heard wood knocks the day before.   After we sat and talked for a time we heard some sticks break, including one loud one less than 50 feet away.  I brought apples with me but I didn't think to put any out when we left.  So, your newbie comment is understood.  As in all things we learn as we go.  My main point was to speculate on how to approach them and I meant it more as a question to kick around on how to interact with them.

 

It was excellent that you put apples out right after some possible interaction, some good thinking that likely impacted your's and Kris's views on this subject.  Who knows, it might not have interacted as much without that action.  Did someone make a plaster cast of the hand print you found?  I believe hand prints are not that common.



#7 jayjeti

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 12:49 PM

Andy & Kris,

 

The handprint you found looks like the left hand with the thumb print on the left.  Do you think the bare area behind the finger impressions is the heel of the hand?  I understand the comments you wrote, "the photos do not do it justice.  The print was much clearer in person."  The footprint photo I took in Oregon didn't do justice to what I saw, which was much deeper in person than it appeared in the photo.

 

 

KnucklePrint2.jpg

Under the community section titled "Sasquatch Theories" I posted a video by M.K. Davis under the topic "Do Sasquatches Camouflage their Hairy Coats."  The White Bigfoot in that video seems to move on all fours before it stands up and runs on two legs.  The great apes walk on their knuckles and perhaps your Sasquatch was moving on all fours when it spied out your camp instead of just bending over and putting a hand down to inspect something.  Here is that video:
 
 
It's interesting how sasquatches conflate both human and great ape characteristics.  Humans don't naturally use their knuckles when getting down on all fours, which is especially difficult for us since our legs are longer than our arms.  Great apes have much shorter legs than their arms.  I've read that sasquatch arms and legs are basically the same lenghth, their joint locations are different than a human's, and the torso is proportionally longer than a human's.  Maybe their physic is such that duel modes of locomotion are more possible.  


#8 SRA-Todd

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 06:40 PM

Can we please dispense with calling yourselves newbies?  I really gets old.


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